Residents of California may want to learn about a new ruling by a federal judge. Not only has the DACA program been renewed, but it also has been opened to new applications. It has returned to its state in 2017 before efforts were made to phase it out by the present administration. This might be especially welcome news for immigrants from Vietnam.

According to the ruling, current residents are now protected, and an indirect path to citizenship, “Advance Parole”, is renewed. Some of the DACA applicants had used this method to gain a green card.

Previous ruling that “Dreamers” could stay

A month ago, the U.S. Supreme Court passed a ruling that enrolled Dreamers could stay in the country and not be deported. However, nothing was mentioned as far as new applications.

The DACA program

What, exactly, is the DACA program? It grants work permits and two-year stays of deportation to illegal aliens who entered the US as juveniles. They must have arrived in 2007 or before, and be under an age limit. These individuals also must have completed high school or currently be pursuing an equivalent degree. Additionally, they should have a clean rap sheet with no criminal activity.

Phaseout stopped

Immigrants from Southeast Asia and Vietnam will recognize that, although renewals were accepted during the three-year legal dispute over immigration, new applications were not accepted. This is no longer the case as younger Dreamers can now apply.

Moreover, DACA recipients can leave the country, return under the Advance Parole program and get their previous illegal status cleared, enabling them to more easily obtain a green card.

You may need help navigating the path to immigration. An attorney who is familiar with the constantly changing field of immigration law might be a valuable resource, especially if he or she is familiar with Vietnamese individuals. The right lawyer might help reunite your family and assist you with obtaining a green card and permanent residency.

Source: SupremeCourt.gov, “Department of Homeland Security et al. v. Regents of the University of California et al.,” Accessed July 27, 2020